Tag Archives: lucas hedges

Mid 90’s (2018)

30 Oct

Academy-Award nominee Jonah Hill takes a turn behind the camera with his directorial debut Mid 90’s, a nostalgia-soaked coming of age story about a group of teen skateboarders in southern California.

Sunny Suljic plays the lead Stevie, a lonely pubescent kid who befriends a group of older boys at the local skate shop. Desperate to escape the constant fighting between his 18-year-old brother (Lucas Hedges) and his fragile mom (Katherine Waterston), Stevie spends as much time as he can with his new friends, including following the group to a drunken party or two. There is the older leader Ray (Na-kel Smith), a pair who go by the nicknames of Fuckshit and Fourth Grade (Olan Prenatt and Ryder McLaughlin, respectively) and the younger Ruben (Gio Galicia) who becomes Stevie’s entry point into the world of skateboarding.

Mid 90’s never directly tells us what year the story is set, but the film is packed with a slew of references from the obvious musical choices to the costume design to the billboards strung along a Los Angeles highway.  The cinematography itself is also a sort of reference; shot on grainy 16mm and featuring a nifty 4:3 aspect ratio, Mid 90’s is a time capsule of a film that seems directly lifted from the VHS era. The score by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross feels almost inappropriately irrelevant, given that just about every scene features some 90’s tune (everyone from Wu-Tang-Clan to Bad Brains to the Beastie Boys makes an appearance). Jonah Hill is a clever enough director to not let pure nostalgia be the focus here, and he naturally centers the story around Stevie’s emotional journey of friendship and discovery. Beautifully acted, the film’s strength comes from it’s breezy, (and at times hilarious) natural dialogue and youthful chemistry between the boys. The group of teens are all phenomenal and put just enough emotional weight into their performances to give the script a lively energy.

There is some unnecessary melodrama near the film’s end and things ultimately fail to wrap up in a satisfying way during its final moments. At a tidy 85 minutes, Mid 90’s almost feels too sleight and insufficiently empty by the time the credits roll. Still, the film marks a skilled accomplishment for Jonah Hill as both a confident director and promising screenwriter.

Bottom Line: Packed to the brim with teen angst and musical montage aplenty, Jonah Hill’s directorial debut Mid 90’s is a breezy, endearing portrait of 1990’s youthfulness and counterculture. 

Rating: 7.6/10 

Film Recipe: Kids + The Florida Project + Boyhood Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 

 

 

 

 

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Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017)

25 Nov

Personal loss, justice, and forgiveness are central themes to the new film from Martin McDonaghThree Billboards Outside Ebbing, MissouriA tragic crime has occurred in this small rural town, and the seemingly apathetic job from law enforcement leaves Mildred (Frances McDormand) no choice but to buy out a series of billboards that specifically call out the local Sheriff Willoughby (Woody Harrelson) for his lackadaisical approach. Of course, news travels fast in a small town like Ebbing, and soon the billboards are even being featured on late night news. This spawns a public rivalry of sorts between Willoughby and Mildred, one that soon spirals out of control and quickly consumes a colorful assortment of Ebbing citizens.

Martin McDonagh’s long awaited follow-up to Seven Psychopaths (2012) doesn’t quite hit the same absurdist notes its predecessor did, but it does supply us with an engaging story delivered through an awkward mix of tragic comedy and melodrama. McDonagh is a writer and director who takes great pleasure in manipulating his audiences; one minute we are feeling intimately sorry for a character, the next – they are blowing their own brains out. It’s in the same storytelling vein as someone like Tarantino or Kevin Smith, but delivered with such black comedic undertones that it both welcomely and uncomfortably upsets the narrative flow.  The emotional shapeshifting of a film like this provides us with a plot that is truly unpredictable while being a lot of gaudy fun.

Most of the characters we meet in Three Billboards are variations on well known tropes, with Mildred being the strong exception. McDormand is the obvious standout here, and her jaded ferocity shines through in every scene. Her son Robbie (Lucas Hedges) is also wonderfully bleak, providing Hedges with another notable role under his young acting belt.

Things really become complicated in the film’s hasty last act. McDonagh is an accomplished writer, and though his characters never quite earn the moral sympathy we should be giving them, the story all comes together in a satisfying, singular way.

Bottom Line: Tonally inconsistent but always entertaining, McDonagh’s latest delivers his signature affinity for black comedy in an emotionally challenging but deeply uncomfortable manner. 

Rating: 7/10 

Film Recipie: A Serious Man + In Bruges + Before The Devil Knows You’re Dead