Tag Archives: John C. Reilly

The Sisters Brothers (2018)

20 Oct

Acclaimed French director Jacques Audiard (Rust and BoneA Prophet) marks his first entry into American territory with The Sisters BrothersSet in the old west (specifically, 1850’s Oregon), Charlie and Eli Sisters (Joaquin Phoenix and John C Reilly respectively) are a pair of contract killers employed by a government official known as The Commodore to track down a particular immigrant worker named Herman Warm (Riz Ahmed) who has become embedded in a caravan of gold prospectors near San Francisco. We also learn of a mysterious detective Morris (Jake Gyllenhaal) who is chasing the same man, albeit for slightly different reasons. The four cross paths in all sorts of ways over the course of the film, and we get various perspectives on certain events along the trail south from Oregon to California – usually with bloody results.

While the film starts off with some pacing issues, we gradually begin to piece together the various narratives, characters, and their ever-shifting motivations. One of the great themes across the western genre is how one’s personal lines of morality become blurred when faced up against survival on the frontier. Audiard pays attention to this idea and makes us care about everyone we are introduced to – regardless of their ethical standing. This kind of characterization helps cement the film as one of the year’s best, and it wouldn’t work if not for the incredible chemistry and talent of all actors involved. Phoenix and Reilly make a fascinating dramatic pair, and seeing the thespians interact in a western setting is constantly engaging. Audiard seems just familiar enough with the genre to make certain scenes feel nostalgic and endearing (the landscape cinematography and detailed production design deserve an enormous amount of credit here) but just when you think you become familiar with what’s going on, the screenplay has numerous ways of surprising you.

Not all surprises are welcome though, and there are a few scenes that just “don’t work” and bring a jarring interruption to the narrative flow. Nevertheless The Sisters Brothers tastefully blends romanticized notions of the genre with historical realism and the occasional touch of Coen-esc humor.

Bottom Line: An absolute adventure film in every sense of the word, The Sisters Brothers is a dark take on the classic American West, boasting an impressive collection of performances and a consistently entertaining screenplay.

Film Recipe: True Grit (2010)The Assassination Of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford + the nihilism and violence of HBO’s Westworld 

Rating: 7.8/10

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The Lobster (2016 Sundance)

25 Jan

There are films. There are movies. And then there is The Lobster. Written and directed by Yorgos Lanthimos, the film is set in the not-too-distant-future where single people are turned into animals if they remain without a significant other for too long. Yes, you read that right – these unfortunate and lonely folks are literally are transformed into another species.

Our hero is a nameless university professor (Colin Farrell) whose wife has just vanished – presumably with another lover. Faced with the possibility of turning into an animal, he enrolls into a hotel that specializes in matchmaking, in hopes that he will soon connect with another love before it’s too late. It’s at this mysterious hotel where he meets an unusual assortment of characters, from a woman with chronic nosebleeds (Jessica Barden), to a man with a lisp (John C. Riley) to a powerful huntress who may or may not be a complete sociopath (Angeliki Papoulia).  Other interesting characters are thrown into the mix during the film’s second half, (which takes place outside of the hotel) including performances by Ben Wishaw, Rachel Weiz, and Lea Seydoux.

In the world of The Lobster, every human is miserable, awkward, and desperately lonely. The resulting interactions between these odd characters are painfully hilarious.  Like Lanthimos’ previous Oscar-nominee DogtoothThe Lobster contains a richly distinct tone that relies on deadpan humor with an absurdist touch. It’s a strange film, with each moment building awkward tension from the previous. Contrast The Lobster with the nihilistic and disturbing Dogtooth, and you see Lanthimos has turned down the gritty, Haneke-esc violence in favor of something more subtle and charming. Though it’s wildly unpredictable and completely absurd, everything in The Lobster feels like it has purpose and meaning, and the layered themes Lanthimos brings up about companionship, love, and connectedness become surprisingly touching.

Boasting an ensemble cast, immaculate cinematography, and a stunning score, The Lobster is a near-masterpiece. Though its artsy weirdness and irrational sensibilities might not be for everyone, Yorgos Lanthimos has no doubt defined himself as a unique and exciting storytelling voice.

Bottom line: Brilliantly crafted with a good amount of dark humor, The Lobster is thoughtfully bizarre and joyously unpredictable; it’s the rare kind of mind-melter that’s both cognitively stimulating and emotionally touching. 

Rating: 10/10 

Film Recipie: Moonrise Kingdom + Borgman + A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence 

Entertainment (Sundance 2015)

7 Feb

What is the difference between Courtney Love and the American flag?

This is one of the many questions comedian Neil Hamburger (Gregg Turkington) asks his audience in the anti-humor film Entertainment. Written by Tim Heidecker from The Tim and Eric Awesome Show Great Joband directed by Rick Alverson (The Comedy), the film follows an aging comedian as he stumbles his way across an increasingly surreal landscape. He crosses paths with a number of bizarre characters played by Michael Cera, Tye Sheridan, and John C. Reilly.

Entertainment as a film acts a metaphor for Hamburger’s comedic routine, which is ironic considering the film defies every single notion its title implies. The audience is forced to watch Hamburger perform his off-color and sad jokes in front of an unimpressed audience at a series of late-night bar shows. The pain and awkwardness of these shows only becomes subsided by incredibly lengthy takes of Hamburger wandering around some deadbeat tourist attraction or making creepy phone calls in an effort to reconnect with his estranged daughter. It’s as if Alverson and Heidecker were purposefully trying to make something that would not only offend their audience, but drive them to a near-maddening boredom as well.  If so, they completely succeeded; I counted 28 walkouts within the first hour of Entertainment’s running time – and this was at a private screening reserved for the press.

Despite what some reviewers will say, I don’t believe there is a such thing as a “good B movie”.  A film is a terrible one regardless of what the artists’ intentions may be. So what if they succeeded in making a bad film? it’s still just a bad film. The characters here are so excruciatingly annoying and the narrative is so bizarrely infuriating that it’s hard to see any redeeming qualities in Entertainment at all. While general audiences should loath this film with disdain, those few individuals familiar with and fans of Neil Hamburger’s style will surely have a new cult favorite on their hands. Heaven help them.

Rating: 1/10 

Similar to: Gummo (1997), Escape From Tomorrow (2013), The Comedy (2012)

Best films of 2012

27 Dec

2012 was a great year for film-lovers.

With a slew of veteran directors including Christopher Nolan, Quentin Tarantino, Steven Spielberg, Wes Anderson, Ridley Scott, Ang Lee, Peter Jackson, Robert Zemeckis, Tom Tykwer, The Wachowski siblings, Rian Johnson, P.T. Anderson, Ben Affleck, Sam Mendes, David O. Russell, and Tom Hooper all releasing films this year, there was no shortage of high-quality movies to choose from. Heck Steven Soderbergh, Tim Burton, and Joss Whedon each had two 2012 films.

This is why making a “best-of” list was no easy task, but after some thought here are my personal picks for the top 25 films of 2012 (meaning they had a widespread theatrical release from jan-dec).

25- Cabin In The Woods 

As cliche’ as it might seem, there is a subtle mix of playfulness and horror throughout Cabin In The Woods that makes it such a fun ride ride to see over and over again.

24 – Les Miserables 

The music, acting, and look of the film all work nicely together to create one of the most powerful musical adaptations I have seen in recent years.

23- The Dark Knight Rises

While it doesn’t quite have the thrills of it’s predecessor, Christopher Nolan’s third and final installment into the Dark Knight franchise is emotionally satisfying and clever with all the twists and turns that make the franchise unique among super-hero films. Even if they don’t make any logical sense.

 

22 – Cloud Atlas 

From the costumes to the cast to the six interwoven stories, everything about Cloud Atlas begs to be called epic.  While the first third of the film is a confusing mess of ideas and characters, things get straightened out nicely in the end once you figure out who is playing who and what planet they are on.  With such an ambitious project as this, it is really, really easy for things to go wrong. Miraculously, Cloud Atlas gets everything right.

21 – Skyfall 

Bond is back and better than ever in this wonderful addition to the 007 franchise.  Hopefully Daniel Craig will not hang up the suit quite yet…

21 – Compliance  

A simple concept brought to life with amazing performances with an even better nail-biter of a script.  This is the stuff great indie flicks are made from.

20- Chasing Ice 

The single most gorgeous-looking documentary I have ever seen.

19- Argo 

Great screenwriting and cinematography create a well-balanced political thriller. The great cast was the icing on the cake.

18- Carnage 

Four people arguing in a living room for hours might not seem like much, but when those four people are John C. Reilly, Christoph Waltz, Jodie Foster, and Kate Winslet…….   things get interesting and dramatically hilarious.

17- Looper

Good movies are usually either intellectually, sensually or emotionally stimulating.  Looper manages to be all three at the same time.

End of Watch

While it might seem like a feature film about the TV show COPS, End of Watch is actually one of the most emotional movies I have seen all year.  Great chemistry from Gyllenhaal and Pena.

16- Seven Psychopaths 

An amazing cast mixed with an ever-unpredictable story makes for an offensively wild film. From the writer/director of the cult-favourite In Bruges.

15- Prometheus 

The epic and visually stunning prequel to Alien, Ridley Scott’s Prometheus proves you can reach the end of a journey looking for answers, only to have more questions that when you first started. The film’s many mysteries had Alien fans scratching their heads for ages, and left me wanting a sequel.

 

14- Headhunters 

Part heist-flick, part survival-drama, Headhunters tells the story of one man’s quest to steal a million-dollar painting. And what ultimately happens when things go sour.  If you are a fan of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo series, don’t miss out on this.

13- The Master 

P.T. Anderson’s sprawling epic about the life of a  very peculiar WWII veteran. Both Phillip S. Hoffman and Joaquin Phoenix give amazing performances and the cinematography is stunning.

12 – The Imposter 

The bizzare-but-true story about a missing Texas boy who winds up in Spain over three years later. This is the WTF documentary everyone will be talking about.

10 – Django Unchained 

Tarantino returns with a revenge/western/drama/shoot-em-up set in the South 2 years prior to the Civil War. It’s long and overly playful, but Django Unchained somehow manages to be one of the year’s most entertaining films (if you can get past the hefty amount of racial slurs and fake blood).

 

9-  The Hunt

8- Holy Motors 

Obscure and senseless, Holy Motors is a collage of surreal scenarios and situations that make up a thought-provoking and mesmerizing piece of cinema.

7 – Frances Ha 

6 – Silver Linings Playbook 

David O Russel cleverly mixes bi-polar disorders with the Philadelphia Eagle’s in this witty romantic comedy.  Bradley Cooper, Robert DeNiro, and Jennifer Lawrence are great, but the real treasure is seeing a chic-flick that is this entertaining without being cliche’.

5 – Killer Joe 

A low-budget crime thriller that hits all the right spots, and then some. Killer Joe boasts some of the best acting of the year, and a script that leaves you on the edge on your seat. You will never look at KFC the same way again.

4 – Moonrise Kingdom 

Wes Anderson’s magnificent drama about a boy and a girl who leave the world behind and set out together for adventure. Not only does the film look amazing, but Anderson has really outdone himself (again) with the set pieces, characters, use of music and brilliant screenplay.  Though it has an all-star cast, Moonrise never lets celebrity get in the way of it’s story and splendor.

3- Beasts of the Southern Wild 

A simple low-budget film that captures the innocence and curiosity of childhood, mixed with the drama and emotion of an entire community. This movie is brilliant, well directed and breathtakingly beautiful from start to finish.

 

2-  We Need To Talk About Kevin 

A powerfully gripping psychological thriller about a child who is…. different. This is one you will want to see a second time around.

1- It’s Such A Beautiful Day 

So there ya go. An honorable mention goes to 21 Jump Street for being the funniest movie of the year.

My picks for film categories can be seen HERE.

Feel free to disagree as there were so many other great films that I didn’t mention, and  if you want to take a look at what i’m most excited about in 2013, click HERE