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Midsommar (2019)

10 Jul

There is a sinister characteristic that runs throughout Ari Aster’s work. The director of 2018’s landmark horrorshow Hereditary seems to embrace all things taboo and macabre.  His latest creation, Midsommar, is no different.

Mostly set in the Swedish countryside, the film follows a couple, Dani (Florence Pugh) and Christian (Jack Reynor) as they try and process Dani’s recent family trauma by attending a pagan summer solstice festival.  Strange occurrences start to make the two suspicious of the festival group, and the couple soon have to reckon with not only the problematic aspects of their own relationship, but also disturbing history and traditions of the reclusive commune.

Midsommar is not your typical horror movie; in fact, it might not even be one at all. Aster shuns most tropes of the genre here, opting instead for a disturbing, slow-burning psychodrama about a relationship in chaos. In Hereditary, Aster’s more conventional take, the long shots and empty atmospheric scenes lessened the overall impact of the film’s more truly shocking moments. Here, with Midsommar, this slow kind of editing plays up the film’s strengths, and deepens the emotional beats that detail the character’s headspace.

Horror fans should feel instantly at home with the texture and shape of Midsommar; Aster does enough to play the genre’s narrative notes in a way that still feels fresh and exciting. Ever the provocateur, there is a perverse sense of accomplishment that seems a part of Midsommar’s shell shock; Aster knows exactly what gets under the skin and delivers it to us tenfold. Part of the film’s ability to effect lies in it’s beautiful contrast between the ugly and the sublime elements of both the movie’s unique environment and the ritualistic traditions of the commune. The cinematography works wonders here, with a bright blue, green, and white palette coloring scenes so brightly lit you feel like squinting.

Most surprisingly, Midsommar is quite funny. Smart amounts of humor are dabbled in and out of the script which adds again to the film’s bold contrasting components and the audience’s eventual discomfort. This isn’t the campy, popcorn-munching stuff of Zombieland or Evil Dead fame; what’s most haunting here is that both the comedic and horror aspects feel so intimate and real. All performances are on point, but in particular Florence Pugh steals the show, giving an impressively grounded portrayal of someone in an extended state of crisis. Over the course of the movie, we explore the world of the Swedish commune through the POV of our star couple, sometimes separate, though more often than not from the perspective of Dani. We feel her psyche heat up into a frenzy, fueled by both her past trauma and her current relationship’s turmoil (and the occasional hallucinogen). As layer by layer of the festival gets exposed, the audience’s anticipation and dread gains more weight, building up finally to a fated but terrifying destination.

Bottom Line: While on paper, Midsommar seems like familiar territory, the stylish execution of the drama and weighted anticipation of mystery make for a singular moviegoing experience that is hard to shake. 

Rating: 7.6/10

Film recipe: The Wickerman (1973) + Magic Magic + Antichrist