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The Dead Don’t Die (2019)

14 Jun

American indie darling Jim Jarmusch enters genre territory for arguably his first time in The Dead Don’t Die with frequent collaborators Bill Murray and Tom Waits in tow. Known for his poetic portrayals of subtle human interactions, Jarmusch would seem, on paper anyway, to be an obvious mismatch for taking on a horror-comedy about zombies eating their way through a rural Pennsylvania town, and the mixed reaction from its Cannes premiere had me less-than-enthused.  Fortunately, the acclaimed director leans into the material with a self-aware smirk and gives the colorful cast of characters room to breath and embrace the absurd.

The film opens with a country radio track (an appropriately-titled song bearing the same name as the film) that soon gives way to a breaking news alert: the moon has been knocked off its axis and is affecting the earth in all sorts of spooky ways including – you guessed it – zombies.

Along with the aforementioned Murray and Waits, the film boasts what has to be one of the best ensembles of the year. Adam Driver, Selena Gomez, Chloe Sevingy, Danny Glover, Tilda Swinton, Steve Buscemi, even Iggy Pop and RZA make an appearance.  Jarmusch, who also wrote the film’s screenplay, gives in to his inner camp sensibilities with the comedy and delivers some of the best bits tongue-in-cheek.

The Dead Don’t Die is stacked with sly pop culture references and meta commentary. Hell, there is even a near-perfect caricature of the film bro here (played brilliantly by Caleb Landry Jones) who only seems to be missing his Criterion Collection pins. Puns, winks, and in-jokes are drawn out almost to a fault which would become annoying if not for the sardonic chemistry between the cast members.  Driver and Murray are particularly great together, playing up the buddy-cop moments with ease.

There are a few left-turns in the script for sure, and some of the dad-joke-worthy moments induce more groans than laughs. Still, there is no denying the sense of charm on display here, and most notably The Dead Don’t Die knows exactly what kind of film it wants to be and hits all the right notes with total consistency.

Bottom Line: Delightfully absurd and genuinely funny, The Dead Don’t Die shows Jarmusch embracing the best of his comedic sensibilities and plays perfectly to its audience’s expectations. 

Rating: 7.7/10 

Film Recipe: What We Do In The Shadows + Zombieland