Tag Archives: Colin Farrell

The Lobster (2016 Sundance)

25 Jan

There are films. There are movies. And then there is The Lobster. Written and directed by Yorgos Lanthimos, the film is set in the not-too-distant-future where single people are turned into animals if they remain without a significant other for too long. Yes, you read that right – these unfortunate and lonely folks are literally are transformed into another species.

Our hero is a nameless university professor (Colin Farrell) whose wife has just vanished – presumably with another lover. Faced with the possibility of turning into an animal, he enrolls into a hotel that specializes in matchmaking, in hopes that he will soon connect with another love before it’s too late. It’s at this mysterious hotel where he meets an unusual assortment of characters, from a woman with chronic nosebleeds (Jessica Barden), to a man with a lisp (John C. Riley) to a powerful huntress who may or may not be a complete sociopath (Angeliki Papoulia).  Other interesting characters are thrown into the mix during the film’s second half, (which takes place outside of the hotel) including performances by Ben Wishaw, Rachel Weiz, and Lea Seydoux.

In the world of The Lobster, every human is miserable, awkward, and desperately lonely. The resulting interactions between these odd characters are painfully hilarious.  Like Lanthimos’ previous Oscar-nominee DogtoothThe Lobster contains a richly distinct tone that relies on deadpan humor with an absurdist touch. It’s a strange film, with each moment building awkward tension from the previous. Contrast The Lobster with the nihilistic and disturbing Dogtooth, and you see Lanthimos has turned down the gritty, Haneke-esc violence in favor of something more subtle and charming. Though it’s wildly unpredictable and completely absurd, everything in The Lobster feels like it has purpose and meaning, and the layered themes Lanthimos brings up about companionship, love, and connectedness become surprisingly touching.

Boasting an ensemble cast, immaculate cinematography, and a stunning score, The Lobster is a near-masterpiece. Though its artsy weirdness and irrational sensibilities might not be for everyone, Yorgos Lanthimos has no doubt defined himself as a unique and exciting storytelling voice.

Bottom line: Brilliantly crafted with a good amount of dark humor, The Lobster is thoughtfully bizarre and joyously unpredictable; it’s the rare kind of mind-melter that’s both cognitively stimulating and emotionally touching. 

Rating: 10/10 

Film Recipie: Moonrise Kingdom + Borgman + A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence 

Seven Psychopaths (2012)

1 Nov

Seven Psychopaths is a great mix of thriller and (mostly) sarcastic, dark comedy.

There are actually only 3 real psychopaths in this film and a handful of fictitious ones.  Seven Psychopaths gets its name from the fictitious film that Hollywood writer Marty (played by Colin Farrel) is working on.  Yes, this is another film that revolves around a screen writer and his impending writer’s block. When Marty is having trouble, his best friend Billy (played by Sam Rockwell) tries to rely on real-life events to give him some inspiration. Things go haywire when the couple gets involved with a high-valued shi-tzu  it kidnaped and it’s owner Charlie (Woody Harlleson) wants some revenge.

Though the plot is absolutely outrageous, Seven Psychopaths is a hell of a good time.    Sam Rockwell is particularly hilarious, especially when contrasted against the ruthlessness of  Woody Harlleson’s character.

Martin McDonagh wrote and directed this film, and  like his previous crime-thriller In Bruges, Seven Psychopaths showcases his clever and witty writing style. With it’s many one-liners and random mix of characters, (Think something along the lines of dark Wes Anderson/Terry Gilliam flick) Seven Psychopaths is one of the most offensively random films I have ever seen, but it also manages to be a lot of fun.

Rating 7/10