The Girl on the Train (2016)

5 Oct

The latest entry to try and cash in on the missing-persons crime drama is The Girl on the Traina film adapted from it’s best-selling source novel by screenwriter Erin Cressida Wilson and director Tate Taylor.

The film follows Rachel (Emily Blunt), an alcoholic divorcee who becomes obsessed with a certain house she sees everyday on her train ride commute. We learn that Rachel and her ex Tom (Justin Theroux) used to live not far from this mystery house, and that Rachel has sort of fantasized on an alternate reality featuring the happy family who resides there. This obsession takes a dark turn when Rachel sees the current tenant Anna cheating on her husband from the train window. The next day Anna has vanished, leaving Rachel tangled in an investigation that slowly consumes her.

It’s obvious that Girl on the Train is trying to tap into whatever magic made films like Gone Girl or Prisoners such popular successes. However, unlike its predecessors the film trying so to intimidate, Girl on the Train never really engages with its viewers the same way and ends up feeling flat and tired. With a skinny plot and underwhelming pay off, Girl on the Train simply takes too long to say too little. There are some interesting perspective shifts that are thrown into the mix, but – thanks to some poor editing – the differing and jumbled flashbacks and flashforwards only end up distracting us from the mystery rather than enhancing it. When looking at the narrative at face value, Girl on the Train never reaches the levels of suspense it might have been capable of.

The one saving grace the film has is with its protagonist. Emily Blunt gives one of her career best performances, playing the girl-gone-crazy trope with enough nuance to make her character infinitely more interesting than the investigation surrounding her.  None of the other characters (the villain might as well have a name tag labeled Mister Misogyny) contain near the amount of intensity or dramatic subtlety that Blunt brings to hers.

Bottom Line: Poor editing and writing make Girl on the Train a lackluster adaptation that never escapes the shadows of its predecessors (most obviously David Fincher’s Gone Girl), but Emily Blunt’s intensity and commitment to her character make the film a somewhat enjoyable watch. 

Film Recipie: One Hour Photo + The Gift + Stir Of Echos + AA Meetings 

Rating: 6/10 

 

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