Faults (2015)

14 Jun

“When you are awake you think more, but when you are tired you feel more,” explains Ansel to his sleep-deprived hostage, Claire. “So I’m forcing you to stay awake so you can feel what I am trying to say to you.” Ansel Roth (Leland Orser) is a former authority on cults, mind control, and brainwashing. He spends his days on the road, trying to sell his latest book at a series of dead-end hotel conventions. He eventually is confronted with two parents (Chris Ellis and Beth Grant) whose daughter Claire (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) has ran away to join a mysterious cult group called Faults. Desperate to have their daughter back, they offer Ansel 20 grand if he can effectively de-brainwash their daughter from this newfound religion. Strapped for cash after a recent divorce, Ansel takes the job.

Faults starts out as a dark comedic piece brought on by Ansel’s quirky and awkward mannerisms. Surprisingly, the comedy then slowly gives way to a dark crime drama and then full-on psychological thriller. It’s a film that’s deeply felt and experienced rather than simply viewed and is sure to leave its subconscious mark in the brain long after the credits.

First time director Riley Stearns does a great job bringing out some killer performances from a pitch-perfect cast of actors. Most of the film revolves around our two leads trying to pry open each other’s brains, which triggers a psychological meltdown in the final act. It wouldn’t work so well without some exceptional acting, but fortunately the performances of Orser and Winstead are both knockouts.

The film does drag somewhere at the halfway point where the dialogue wears a bit thin, but for the most part Faults is a stimulating puzzle capable of leaving you laughing at one moment and horrified the next.

Bottom Line: Expertly mixing tone and genre, Faults is a darkly satisfying indie mindfuck sure to please those looking for something different.

 

Screenshot 2015-06-07 22.03.29

Rating: 8/10 

 

Film Recipe: Upstream Color (2013), + Sound Of My Voice (2011) + Coen Bros

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