Boyhood (2014)

23 Sep

Also known as “Richard Linklater‘s 12-year Project”, Boyhood follows a young boy through his childhood form ages 6-18. Linklater literally spent a few weeks every year shooting the film one scene at a time, using the same cast of actors. This incredible test of patience enables audiences to see characters literally mature and grow years before their eyes in a few hours.

The passage of time itself becomes a recurring theme in Boyhood. We see new friendships form, develop and dissolve; hair grows out and gets cut and dyed. Linklater pays particular attention to the little details which also clue us in as to what year the story takes place in (most notably, the clever use of soundtracks – featuring everyone from Soulja Boy to Arcade Fire). A child sitting at an older-model Mac playing oregon trail lets us know we are somewhere in the early 2000’s. Later, the same child is stealing a lawn sign that reads MCCAIN/PALIN in order to appease his liberal father. Ellar Coltrane plays our star boy Mason, and though his acting skills understandably are a bit rough at first, he quickly finds his unique voice and character. Mason’s sister Sam (played by here Lorelai Linklater) is also great, and Supporting work is provided by the always-excellent Ethan Hawke, and an Oscar-worthy performance by Patricia Arquette.

Rather than adding extra melodrama or building up to some heart-stopping climax, Linklater finds pleasure in the little things, and lets the simple beauty and heartbreak of life speak for itself. The result is a sort of memory montage of various defining moments experienced in the life of a child turning into a man.There is a pure truth-ness to the film that Linklater really expands upon. When viewed in it’s entirety, watching boyhood is an incredibly nostalgic, moving, and overall rewarding experience.

Rating – 10/10 

Similar films: Before Midnight, The Tree of Life, The Squid and the Whale

 

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One Response to “Boyhood (2014)”

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  1. Diary of a Teenage Girl (Sundance 2015) | A Journey Through Cinema - February 6, 2015

    […] From classic films like Stand By Me, to contemporary ones like Superbad or last year’s Boyhood, film culture seems to be obsessed with capturing that moment where children start see the […]

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